Oops...BIG OOPS!

I was at our local chapter of the Modern Woodworkers Association gathering yesterday and I told the story of this blog post and was teased about not posting an embarrassing story.  If you knew me, you'd know that I never walk away from embarrassment.  The funny thing is that I had these pictures all ready to write the post but just hadn't yet.  Well, here it is...

After working on the tenon's on all the aprons, I started working on the first mortise.  I marked the top and bottom shoulders and the location with a slight shadow edge between the front of the apron and the leg.  I then started cutting the mortise.  I used a combination of a brace and bit and various chisels including a mortise chisel.

initial fit of apron into leg

initial fit of apron into leg

Above you see the initial fit of the apron into the leg.  Using my chisels, i pared away material until I got a nice and tight fit.

Final fit of first mortise and tenon

Final fit of first mortise and tenon

As you can see, it's a super fit with a nice friction tight fit.  I was really pleased with this and new this had to be a sign on how the rest were going to go.

I left this and came back the next day...

...and found that all was not so great.

New leg next to old/bad leg

New leg next to old/bad leg

The leg on the right was the first one and if you can look, I put the mortise on the wrong side of the leg, given that I wanted the taper to be on the inside faces of the legs.  I knew that a patch (filling the mortise) would not look great so I made a new/replacement leg and then carefully laid out the mortise on the correct side.

It was very frustrating but I took it as a chance to practice the skills needed to make a tapered leg and a new mortise.  The results were still quite good.

Dry Fit

Dry Fit

Above you can see a first dry fit with the assistance of one of the recipients of one of the desks (Mitchell, my youngest).  I still have one more leg to finish and then the work to fit the tenons from both aprons into each leg.